People often ask what makes The Self Defense Training System different than all others and there is only one place to start – The Drop Step.

In fact, I’ve been doing this for decades and if it wasn’t for my recent conversation with Elite Member Sean Duffy, I wouldn’t have had this epiphany.

 

The following is the incredible insight  by  Sean posted in the forum after discovering an old post from Paul P:

 

Ok, so I found this discussion of it in another thread. I think this makes a lot of sense. I think it also answers my question, in that I’m over thinking it. The move [Drop Step] itself is pretty instinctive. Thinking about it trips me up. Also, the idea of drop stepping BOB around for 5 miles is a great idea. 1f602

You know, my favorite part of the whole SDTS “system” is still, and will always be, the drop step.

When I first saw that described, a light went on, because it was something I already understood instinctively, but seeing it described made it a conscious realization.

It is also the real “secret” behind SDTS.

It also makes the debate of hand position irrelevant.

Why is the drop step the most important thing?

Well, first, in a high stress, violent situation, if you don’t run away, your instinctive response will be to close distance with your opponent. This is why, for example, guys end up wrestling on the ground, a lot of times.

In such a situation, you instinctively realize that to maximize the probability of damage to your opponent, you need to be as close to him as possible, for greatest leverage, and to displace his center of gravity with your own. [SDTS Forward Drive]

Movie fights, or sport fights, at distance aren’t going to happen in life or death situations.

Very much like sex. You want to be on them hardcore, as soon as possible. You can’t do a whole lot of meaningful damage from a distance. <<< IMPORTANT

The drop step just naturally flows right along with this instinct.

Second, I would say that when you violently close distance as soon as possible, you will jam and neutralize your opponent’s attacks, even if he’s already in the process of throwing a punch, kick, whatever. <<<REALLY IMPORTANT

In other words, if a guy begins to throw a punch, and you simply immediately run into his ass, his punch is useless. BINGO!

So, for example, the idea of a “flinch” response is useful if surprised, but you can also “flinch” by stepping INTO whatever is coming at you. If a weapon is involved, then the flinch merely involves a minor deflection enroute to the opponent.

But, the drop step IS the flinch. It IS the most important thing.

Thirdly, the drop step is most important, because it delivers to the opponent your most dangerous tool of violence, which is that of YOUR OWN BODYWEIGHT.

Because, whatever appendage you decide to crush him with, it is your BODYWEIGHT that is doing the real damage. It is your bodyweight that also makes it so much easier.

Further, if the opponent is already moving to you when you drop step your bodyweight into, say, his throat, then that piece of trash is going down real hard. 

If a guy swings a bat, and you violently charge into it, you’re going to neutralize it.

And, how hard is it to learn the damn drop step?

SO simple. So vicious. So easy. Solves SO many problems simultaneously.

Try to charge a fortune in classes to learn the simple “defense” tactic of running into a guy attacking you.

The only reason it may seem strange at first, is because you’ll naturally freeze, wanting to run away.

So, you condition to react INTO the opponent, rather than away.

You don’t condition a “flinch” response of a static forearm shield. That’s a defensive, losing mindset. Better to combine the dropstep with forearm to the throat. Same movement, except…it’s MOVING INTO the opponent.

Your mind is the weapon, and your ENTIRE BODY is the tool.

It’s important to remember that you are smashing your opponent with your ENTIRE BODY. Whatever extension of it happens to hit him is merely a question of convenience and targeting.

Just a shoulder into his solar plexus, with your ENTIRE BODY, as he’s unloading something will be far from pleasant. And, how hard is that?

Hell, a 90 lb chick could put me down with that, if I was dumb enough to do that.

Fourth, the drop step just naturally allows you to crush ankles, insteps, and feet, etc, in that same natural forward movement of your ENTIRE BODY. These are often overlooked, but generally easy to get to when you are MOVING INTO THE OPPONENT.

The important lesson of the drop step is to MOVE INTO the opponent at all times. INTO, INTO, INTO, INTO, INTO. [SDTS FORWARD DRIVE]

Until he’s dead or you decide to be merciful, because he’s now writhing in pain beneath you, dreading his imminent delivery to the devil.

If I was training people, we would do nothing but the drop step for an entire day. They’d drop step like five miles, shoving a BOB on a cart all over the place. Because THAT is the foundation.

Not just physically, but mentally.

###

End and I couldn’t have said it better myself (that’s why I posted it!).

The Secret to the SDTS is the Drop Step and the Forward Drive. It’s what separates us from 99.9% of any other systems out there and it is the “secret”. This will enable you to control the two pillars of self defense MOMENTUM and BALANCE.

To Learn more about the SDTS go HERE <<<

Great Post Sean…you make my job easy brother.

D

 

  1. Anonymous 3 weeks ago

    this would also highlight the importance of training. to feel what it feels like to get that flinch/freeze feeling, and then how to overcome it. the manuevers in the system are simple, training your mind, that’s truely the hard part. do you have a survivor or victim mentality?

    in white water kayaking, for example, we have to 2 to major counter intuitive motions. the motions are simple, but the flinch/freeze, or over thinking it can trip you up quick. 1st, when bashing through boulders, you hug your rocks so as not to be capsized or pinned (most want to lean away, and this will get you tipped and pinned), and second, the eskimo roll, when your head is underwater, your natural reaction is to bring your head up first. do that and you’ll never roll, i don’t care how hard you hip snap is. your head is in actuallity the last thing out of the water, everything else rolls up first.

    i know, white water and self defense aren’t exactly comparable, but the concept of the need to train your mind to do whatever it takes to make it through does translate.

    as our CEO says, train honestly.

  2. nwillison21@gmail.com
    nwillison21@gmail.com 3 weeks ago
    Member Since: 10/10/18

    I was the anon above. difference between posting in messenger vs web browser (ugh, tech problems), so, to recap

    this would also highlight the importance of training. to feel what it feels like to get that flinch/freeze feeling, and then how to overcome it. the manuevers in the system are simple, training your mind, that’s truely the hard part. do you have a survivor or victim mentality?

    in white water kayaking, for example, we have to 2 to major counter intuitive motions. the motions are simple, but the flinch/freeze, or over thinking it can trip you up quick. 1st, when bashing through boulders, you hug your rocks so as not to be capsized or pinned (most want to lean away, and this will get you tipped and pinned), and second, the eskimo roll, when your head is underwater, your natural reaction is to bring your head up first. do that and you’ll never roll, i don’t care how hard you hip snap is. your head is in actuallity the last thing out of the water, everything else rolls up first.

    i know, white water and self defense aren’t exactly comparable, but the concept of the need to train your mind to do whatever it takes to make it through does translate.

    as our CEO says, train honestly.

  3. Jeff Voorhies 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 05/31/17

    The “Drop Step” is what I first learned from my instructor 3 1/2 decades ago in Kenpo. Moving forward solves many problems, you can take away power from a kick, punch, clubbed tool, knife just by closing the distance. Keep moving forward!

    • Author
      Damian 2 weeks ago
      Member Since: 10/10/18

      Love it Jeff!

      • Author
        Damian 2 weeks ago
        Member Since: 10/10/18

        Fact is taking ground is a fundamental truth of all combat. The one is advancing is winning and the one that is retreating is losing.

        This is the same for interpersonal violence, and any size fighting force on any scale.

        We used to do this too in sparring but it was completely lost when it came to self defense.

        Now once we engage it’s always move forward, always advance with urgency.

  4. Zeek 2 weeks ago

    Stepping into a knife or other blade weapon will also end the fight quickly, but you might not like the final score.

  5. Zeek 2 weeks ago

    Stepping into a knife or other bladed weapon will also end the fight quickly, but you might not like the final score.

    • Author
      Damian 2 weeks ago
      Member Since: 10/10/18

      No Zeek, not at all.

      We’re not made of butter and if you get cut a couple of times you’re generally not going to notice and you’re not going to bleed out.

      The force required to plunge an edged weapon into a target is not light.

      Like you discover in Module 8- getting cut while you’re beating a target into oblivion is a lot different than being stabbed to death while you’re trying to do some disarming nonsense.

  6. Archie 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 03/21/14

    I got to agree the drop step is one of my fav techniques from SDTS. It helps add power and it also makes the assailant flinch a little bit which helps put them back on the heels.

  7. Clint cron 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 11/07/18

    Stepping into a knife is actually the smartest move you can make if can’t run. The knife becomes useless when you shut the brain off. The forward drop step needs to be accompanied by a forearm smash or knuckles to the throat. Broken, crushed trachea renders all weapons useless. It’s not the movies. People don’t get their throats cut or crushed under pressure, stand back up, look you in the eye, and then shoot or stab you. I assure you when you successfully shut the brain off, the weapon becomes nothing more than a paper weight. Damien, Correct me if I’m wrong.

    • Damian Author
      Damian 2 weeks ago
      Member Since: 10/10/18

      You’re right on track Clint.
      Look – apparently it people think we’re going to blindly run into an attacker AND the attacker is going to stand still – hold his ground and plunge the weapon into us.
      We will be charging, spitting, kicking, hacking, using pepper spray, firearms, books, rocks, running around tables and telephone poles…USING OUR ENVIRONMENT and whatever tools we can access to take control of the momentum and keep him off balance.

      Now…even if he stabs us once, or twice…even multiple times – the chances of you surviving are GREAT.

      The HUGE PROBLEM that comes with typical training is that it puts your focus on the weapon NOT the man.

      The result is that if you’re stabbed…which probably will happen (and what most “experts” agree with) is that you will continue to CHASE THE WEAPON.

      This only works to your attackers advantage because he still has his balance and can still continue to cause damage while you bleed out.

      More important — it also changes your mindset of REALLY trying to destroy your attacker to the weapon and the notion that you’re losing the fight because you got stabbed.

      Google knife wound…you’re going to see people surviving some nasty shit.

      You can survive, you will survive —ATTACK THE MAN!!!

  8. Lee Griffin 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 03/03/17

    Hi Lee Griffin here I’ve always since I’ve been a member of the sdts been a big fan of the basics especially the drop step it’s taken all gear I used to have of people away

  9. mail@icandefend.com
    mail@icandefend.com 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 12/29/15

    When I first cracked SDTS open, the drop step was a brain twister, for about 5 minutes. As the light went on about its value, I still remember grinning like a prospector who just hit a 10 ton vein. I figured SDTS is gold.

  10. William 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 03/07/16

    There are two kinds of dogs in a fight…the one that goes in without hesitation for its own safety and crashes the opponent wins the fight. The one that backs up is only defending after that. Attitude plus momentum is the winning combination.

    • Damian Author
      Damian 2 weeks ago
      Member Since: 10/10/18

      Amen.

  11. Brett 2 weeks ago
    Member Since: 08/24/16

    Good article!!!

  12. Anonymous 2 weeks ago

    Great article for sure, thanks for all who share.

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