[TRENDING] BJJ Master Killed in Mugging

[TRENDING] BJJ Master Killed in Mugging

BJJ master Bruno Inacio Nunes dies while trying to stop robbery in Rio de Janeiro

Brazilian jiu-jitsu master blackbelt at the gym Ipanema Fight Gym, Bruno Inacio Nunes, passed away at 37 when he tried to fight back during a mugging on a bus in Rio de Janeiro. Nunes was on his way to a gig where he worked as security and according to Nunes’ brother, Leonardo, he tried to choke the assailant, but was shot in the head.

“The bus wasn’t too crowded, one guy was just picking up everyone’s belongings. When Bruno was approached, he thought he could apply a rear naked choke. He tried to disarm the robber, he saw the opportunity, but was shot in the head, on his left eyebrow,” Leonardo told local newspaper, O Dia, as it was reported by Tatame.

Nunes had already been mugged twice before and now leaves behind three kids. One of Ipanema Fight’s owners, Marcos Nigri Dana, explained how Bruno’s work affected the neighborhood positively.

“We were surprised. People wouldn’t stop texting us. We are all shocked with all this violence. He had both really young and older students. He would bring them all together, he would take them to the tournaments and was always bringing something new to practice. We will pay a tribute to him on Wednesday. We have students of all religions, so we will make something where everyone can participate. All students are asking for it. He was a master, a teacher and an extraordinary person.”

Article Published: http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2015/6/23/8829159/bruno-inacio-nunes-master-dies-robbery-rio-de-janeiro-grappling-news

Published by theselfdefenseco

Founder, The Self Defense Company

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6 Comments

  1. Just goes to show you, all the training one undergoes does not prepare one for the unexpected folks! Why would one apply a specific technique and failing to take into account others being in the vicinity to do harm to you? As the saying goes, every dog has its day!

  2. I’m confused as to why he attempted a choke on a guy with a gun. Or why you would attempt a choke in real life pretty much ever. It was habit, obviously. This story really sucks because this was a good guy who has conditioned himself with a faulty response. If he felt enough opening to attempt a choke, a strike or two or three likely would’ve worked. Or a pencil into his throat. But I get the impression that his sport conditioning left him mentally short of a readiness to kill. Because killers don’t go for chokes in these scenarios. Only nice guys who feel sorry for the bad guy, even if he’s a life threatening maggot. You only train to kill. Viciously like a mad gotdamn rabid dog. Easier to back off than amp up. I once tried to choke a guy once – without injuring him first. Very difficult. Might be nice to finish with if you have the luxury, but chokes and holds on uninjured people are low probability, and a waste of energy even if successful. I only needed that one failure to realize how stupid it was. And, again, it was because I wasn’t committed to maiming the guy, and was trying to be nicely violent. No. Violence is either on or off. There is no civilized. Which is why I don’t get in fights, or seek them. Because my entire mindset is different now. This situation really f’in sucks, and I really sympathize with the folks who knew this guy. I really hope they learned the lesson of sport versus killing. RIP, bro.

  3. The best way to end a threat is to end the threat as quickly as possible. No one knows when the assailant will pull a gun, knife, etc. Or has 3 friends around the corner. Use the SDTS striking techniques to put the assailant out asap. Nice guys finish last. Regrets for the loss of a martial arts brother. Condolences to the BJJ family in Rio and around the world. The loss of any one of us is a loss to all of us.

  4. Paul will prevails comment was on point. Sport training only gives you a limited amount of preparedness for a real life , potentially lethal encounter. Being in great shape and having a good arsenal of techniques is only part of the training. Much more goes into it. Unfortunately most sport fighters today think they are superhuman and are at a loss to understand why or how things like this happen. Broaden your skill sets, keep an open mind, study the savages and check your ego at the door. Condolences to his family.

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