Virginia to Outlaw All forms of Self Defense

Virginia to Outlaw All forms of Self Defense

Virginia to Outlaw Kickboxing, Tai Chi, Firearms Instruction and Self-defense Training

The State of Virginia is proposing a new 2020 law known as SB64 (see link here) which will be taken up by the Senate beginning January 8, 2020.

The law would instantly transform all martial arts instructors into criminal felons. This includes instructors who teach kickboxing, BJJ, Krav Maga, boxing and even Capoeira.

It would also criminalize all firearms training classes, including concealed carry classes.

It would even criminalize a father teaching his own son how to use a hunting rifle.

Specifically, the law says that a person “is guilty of unlawful paramilitary activity” (a class 5 felony) if that person:

“Assembles with one or more persons for the purpose of training with, practicing with, or being instructed in the use of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons…”

The phrase “technique capable of causing injury or death to persons” covers all forms of martial arts and self-defense training, including Krav Maga, BJJ, boxing and other contact martial arts such as Tae Kwon Do or Tai Chi.

Under the proposed law, all forms of self-defense training — including hand-to-hand martial arts training — would be considered “paramilitary activity,” even if the training consists of private classes involving just one instructor and one student.

That’s because every form of martial arts training imparts skills which could be used to cause injury to other persons.

In fact, according to the language of the law, just “one” person learning such arts is a felony crime, which means that watching a DVD on Krav Maga would be a felony crime.

Here is the full text of the proposed law:

SENATE BILL NO. 64
Offered January 8, 2020
Prefiled November 21, 2019
A BILL to amend and reenact §18.2-433.2 of the Code of Virginia, relating to paramilitary activities; penalty.

Bill Title: Paramilitary activities; penalty.
Spectrum: Partisan Bill (Democrat 1-0)
Status: (Introduced) 2019-11-21 – Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
———-
Patron– Lucas
———-
Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
———-
Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Virginia:

  1. That §18.2-433.2 of the Code of Virginia is amended and reenacted as follows:

§18.2-433.2. Paramilitary activity prohibited; penalty.

A person shall be is guilty of unlawful paramilitary activity, punishable as a Class 5 felony if he:

  1. Teaches or demonstrates to any other person the use, application, or making of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, knowing or having reason to know or intending that such training will be employed for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder; or
  2. Assembles with one or more persons for the purpose of training with, practicing with, or being instructed in the use of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, intending to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder; or
  3. Assembles with one or more persons with the intent of intimidating any person or group of persons by drilling, parading, or marching with any firearm, any explosive or incendiary device, or any components or combination thereof.
  4. That the provisions of this act may result in a net increase in periods of imprisonment or commitment. Pursuant to §30-19.1:4 of the Code of Virginia, the estimated amount of the necessary appropriation cannot be determined for periods of imprisonment in state adult correctional facilities; therefore, Chapter 854 of the Acts of Assembly of 2019 requires the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission to assign a minimum fiscal impact of $50,000. Pursuant to §30-19.1:4 of the Code of Virginia, the estimated amount of the necessary appropriation cannot be determined for periods of commitment to the custody of the Department of Juvenile Justice.

Source: NaturalNews.com (excerpt) / Reference: Legiscan.com

Article from HUMANS ARE FREE

Published by theselfdefenseco

Founder, The Self Defense Company

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43 Comments

  1. I know the world is crazy…but this is INSANE. I highly doubt this will get passed…but the idea that an elected official is proposing this — nuts.

    The intent is clear – to target militias and other groups (which is another 2nd amendment right). So I seriously doubt this is going anywhere.

        1. so how would this affect Fort Lee???? are they going to take action for their training???? this beyond a mess…..

  2. So the interesting thing here is that the part of the bill you quote as an area of concern (and I share it) is already law in Virginia, and has been since at least 1987. You can read that law here: https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/18.2-433.2/
    What the proposed legislation you have cited is an amendment to the current law that adds this sentence:
    “3. Assembles with one or more persons with the intent of intimidating any person or group of persons by drilling, parading, or marching with any firearm, any explosive or incendiary device, or any components or combination thereof.”
    This amendment seems more designed to deal with open-carry situations (also a concern).
    But the portion of the law you are concerned about is technically already the law.

      1. No…it’s not illegal because you’re not training your students to use it with “intent to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder”

      2. You left out one small detail:
        “intending to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder;”

  3. Part 2:
    So…why are martial arts dojos still open if this is the law in Virginia? Because of the second half of the sentence that you did not mention in your article. The full sentence reads:
    “Teaches or demonstrates to any other person the use, application, or making of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, knowing or having reason to know or intending that such training will be employed for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder;”
    So in addition to teaching martial arts, you would also have to KNOW or INTEND that the training you provide will be used for the purposes of civil disorder. I don’t think any of our schools do that…and therefore are not guilty of this law.

    1. You left out one small detail:
      “intending to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder;”

  4. Here’s the problem…how do you prove or disprove that?
    Example – you train a guy and he sends you a text telling you that he hates (NAME GROUP) then he goes and attacks (NAME GROUP) at some sort of (NAME GROUP) rally with a few of his friends.

    Now what?

    1. As I said, I share your concerns, they are valid. I just want to make sure people understand the existing legal context. Like so many things, it’s complicated. Full respect to you for the work that you do.

      1. And you are correct, it would be very difficult to prove…and fortunately for us, in this country, the burden of proof is on the prosecutor, not the defendant.

        1. “burden of proof…” Unless you are Donald Trump and you are told you must prove your innocence during the impeachment sham.

  5. Pure communist like liberal bull. This mess is going to spur some terrible revolutionary war that will make the LA riots look like a church picnic
    I’m really frightened at all these hair brained attacks on our constitution that without were nothing as a nation

  6. Well you vote for Democrats that’s what you get. Now deal with like everyone else that didn’t vote for them. Fyi, wait until public school laws star becoming like California.

  7. Good grief. Did any of you actually *read* the amendment?? It’s pointed specifically at people whose sole intent is to foment domestic terrorism. “intending to employ such training” and “intent of intimidating”.

    Try reading.

    1. Define “intending to employ such training”

      As an instructor – you could be found responsible for training these people. The problem is – they are legislating INTENT and not ACTIONS.

      So you don’t even need to break the law…you just have to “intend” to break the law. You don’t see a problem here?

      1. Training someone specifically to create civil disobedience is a lot different than me getting martial arts training from you and me then using that training to beat and rob someone.

        But if you had a bunch of people in your school with the intent on teaching them to be terrorists… See the difference?

        1. Here’s the thing…we already have a law for this…its RICO that covers conspiracy and association.
          It’s too far reaching and broad.

          Define “INTENT”.

          For example…you own a firearm school and a few guys want to learn long range tactics. It just so happens that these guys belong to a group who is plotting to kill the governor.

          *Based on what you’re citing – you would have a hell of a time proving your innocence because you TRAINED these subjects. Especially when LE is building a case. And if you think they’re all about “finding the innocent” I have a bridge I can sell you. The more convictions – the better the score.

          1. Have all your students sign a declaration that what they learn will not be used to create civil unrest. Done.

  8. Fake news. You print the bill but apparently never read it. Subsection (1) and (2) specifically state such instruction “…intending to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder…” Section (3) declares violation with the intent to ”… intent of intimidating any person or group of persons…”

    None of these sections are relevant to your firearms or Karate class or to the Dad teaching his son to shoot.

    1. Here’s the thing…we already have a law for this…its RICO that covers conspiracy and association.
      It’s too far reaching and broad.

      Define “INTENT”.

      For example…you own a firearm school and a few guys want to learn long range tactics. It just so happens that these guys belong to a group who is plotting to kill the governor.

      *Based on what you’re citing – you would have a hell of a time proving your innocence because you TRAINED these subjects. Especially when LE is building a case. And if you think they’re all about “finding the innocent” I have a bridge I can sell you. The more convictions – the better the score.

      1. But, with your example, as a firearms instructor, if you had been training people for, say, 2 years. And you have had hundreds of students over those 2 years. 30 of which were within 6 months of any civil unrest caused by some of your students and it was only about 6 of those 30 who actually took your training with foul intent. Those numbers from your class would give you enough to show that you don’t train people to use guns for civil unrest…unless they had direct evidence that you had told your students to use their training to do what they did. In that case, you would be screwed, but if you have the numbers on your side, it would make it difficult for a prosecutor to prove intent. You can’t prove someone did something this time but not the other 20 times that they might have had a chance lol. That’s my opinion anyway. I don’t live there, just found the article intriguing and wanted to add my 2 cents.

  9. Craziness. This is the world we live in. One side definitely seems to think it is ok to presume someone guilty. Get a prosecutor who feels that way, and no doubt, there will be a case involving a self defense instructor.

  10. I am amazed… I thought California had crazy laws, but this makes that state look normal.
    It doesn’t appear that they criminalize the use of martial arts, or crossing state lines to train.
    I have to believe this will never pass.
    Just crazy, I’m still stunned…

  11. Bottom line: even though the legislation has a small chance of impacting instructors at this time, the probability can increase as the unrest in this country increases. The federal government in particular but even state and local, do not inspire alot of trust lately when it comes to abuse of power. For the record, I’m a law and order conservative who is no cop hater.

    1. Agreed. I get nervous when we start to try and monitor intent without opportunity and ability. A group training in CQB without specific intent is a lot different than a group that is training for a specific mission. A kid with a “kill list” and access to weapons is different than a kid taking a firearms training class.

      I feel this law is unclear and just doesn’t make that distinction.

  12. Self defense training should only be banned if this lawmaker can provide defense for each and everyone with certainty.

  13. I looked on two websites I trust and learned that the internet buzz on the “Proposed Virginia law banning self-defense teaching” is false. The sites say the part of the law being quoted is already law and has been since shortly after the incident in Charlottesville in 2017. The other statements were added by the Alex Jones’ conspiracy trolling site, Infowars, which posted an article originally published by junk news site Natural News. The NN site falsely reported the State of Virginia will consider legislation outlawing martial arts and firearms instruction. Snopes site added, “Finally, the laws don’t make it illegal for martial arts or shooting-range instructors to teach students disciplines like “krav maga, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, kickboxing, tai chi” or “firearms instruction.” The laws restrict people from various military-like activities that result in violence and civil disorder. The amendment to the Virginia law, specifically, prohibits marching with weapons or explosives for the purpose of intimidation. We, therefore, rate this claim “False.”

    Apparently, most states have laws that bar “marching with weapons or explosives for the purpose of intimidation.”

  14. The bill may not be much now however, once the pry bar is in the door it can soon be opened. For sure something to keep an eye on.

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